Much as Colin Powell deserves a tribute as America’s first Black secretary of state and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he was under-recognized as a bridge-builder and champion of political moderation. Powell, who died Monday, was a Republican who dared to challenge his own party’s orthodoxy and tried to avert its drift toward right-wing extremism. The fact that he was later joined in his call for moderation by one of the architects of that rightward lurch — former Vice President Dick Cheney — attests to Powell’s judgment and thoughtful foresight.

Friday, October 22, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought forth shows of bravery and dedication from nurses, doctors and other health-care workers. In a less dramatic way, other essential workers, from supermarket clerks to bus drivers, have stepped up to serve the public at risk to themselves.

Thursday, October 21, 2021
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

One could say that there was a “pre” and “post” Gen. Colin Powell for the American right. It’s this ideological evolution of many on the right that should ultimately be remembered as the four-star general’s enduring legacy, sparked in that historical moment in 2003 for which Powell repeatedly spent the last several years expressing regret, right up until his death this week at age 84.

St. Louis leaders aren’t the only ones reassessing the wisdom of downsizing the city police department to mollify a loud but not necessarily representative group of far-left activists. Rising violent crime is plaguing cities across the country, and a growing number of Democratic mayors have realized that defunding the police is the opposite of what’s needed to retake control of the streets.

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

When the North Carolina Supreme Court renders judgement, it should generally be the last word on the matter. That decision rendered by the state’s seven justices — regardless of how it might come down — should be above reproach or question of impartiality.

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North Carolina’s Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson is shameless when it comes to bellowing against make-believe threats to God, guns and heterosexuals. But even if the state’s highest-elected Republican is beyond embarrassment, he is still embarrassing for North Carolina, and especially for North Carolina Republicans.

Facebook has become the latest company that everyone loves to hate, and internal documents stolen by an employee have become an opening to blame the social-media giant for America’s ills. The company has made mistakes, but it’s worth sorting the genuine issues from the opportunism of politicians looking to censor opponents.

In September, Republican opposition in the U.S. Senate derailed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. The proposed law, which passed the House, would have made it easier for the federal government to track and prosecute police who use excessive force, and it would have limited qualified immunity, which shields police in most private civil lawsuits.

It’s hard to pinpoint the most maddening thing about the rushed, convoluted and opaque redistricting process that North Carolina Republican legislative leaders have been running in recent weeks, but there are several leading contenders.

The message to North Carolina General Assembly’s leaders cannot be clearer — coming from a Superior Court Judge; the plaintiffs including six local school boards and 14 parents; the defendants including the state of North Carolina and the State Board of Education.

Superior Court Judge David Lee has set a mid-October deadline for state lawmakers to comply with rulings in the decades-long Leandro school funding case. Those rulings require the legislature to fund public schools at a level that will provide every student the opportunity to receive a “sound, basic education,” as required by the North Carolina Constitution.

Once again, a North Carolina court has decided that a voter ID law proposed by the Republican-led legislature was written with ill intent — racial bias, in particular — and struck it down as unconstitutional. The decision, declared by two of three trial judges, isn’t surprising, not only because of precedent, but because it’s so obvious.

You’ve likely seen the headlines about COVID-19 killing radio hosts and activists who opposed vaccines and masks. Several of those headlines were about Caleb Wallace, a Texan who helped organize a “freedom rally” this summer to protest mask-wearing. Some corners of the internet reacted with ridicule to news of his death last month, sparing no thought to Wallace’s grieving wife and daughters.

“This outlines how the Department of Public Instruction, in tandem with the State Board of Education, will assist all education stakeholders as they work to overcome the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic while establishing a framework to achieve the long-term goal of ensuring a sound, basic education for all students in the state.”

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) is a woman of the people. So much so that she walked past a Black Lives Matter protest outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and joined the starry Met Gala inside as a guest earlier this week.

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