Tuesday, October 19, 2021

I’ve been spending a lot of time recently in conversation with right-leaning leaders, policy experts, donors and activists. My purpose is to assess the health and trajectory of American conservatism at this critical moment.

Thursday, October 21, 2021

I’ve been spending a lot of time recently conversing with right-leaning leaders, policy experts, donors and activists in order to assess the health and trajectory of American conservatism at this moment.

Confession: I used to be a Republican. I briefly became one years ago while living amongst the ultrawoke on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Their authoritarian diktats drove me crazy. And their narrow definition of economic interests as the rich versus the poor — with the middle class almost invisible — underscored their political naivete.

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America has a lot of free stuff. Get to the United States and you will be able to have nearly everything taken care of by the U.S. government. That seems to be the prevailing wisdom held by many migrants who make the journey from Central America through Mexico to our southern border, and eventually, with our lax immigration policies, into America.

One could say that there was a “pre” and “post” Gen. Colin Powell for the American right. It’s this ideological evolution of many on the right that should ultimately be remembered as the four-star general’s enduring legacy, sparked in that historical moment in 2003 for which Powell repeatedly spent the last several years expressing regret, right up until his death this week at age 84.

St. Louis leaders aren’t the only ones reassessing the wisdom of downsizing the city police department to mollify a loud but not necessarily representative group of far-left activists. Rising violent crime is plaguing cities across the country, and a growing number of Democratic mayors have realized that defunding the police is the opposite of what’s needed to retake control of the streets.

When the North Carolina Supreme Court renders judgement, it should generally be the last word on the matter. That decision rendered by the state’s seven justices — regardless of how it might come down — should be above reproach or question of impartiality.

“Help Wanted” signs are ubiquitous in the Southern port city of Mobile, Alabama, covering doors and windows of retail shops, restaurants, bars and even quickie shipping outposts. My favorite sandwich shop cut its hours, the manager says, because he can’t find enough help to man longer shifts.

A few weeks ago, the Associated Press and a nonprofit journalism outfit called The Markup released a dataset and news stories purporting to prove the existence of pervasive discrimination against racial minorities by mortgage lenders. The McClatchy newspapers in North Carolina (The Charlotte Observer, The News & Observer in Raleigh, and the Herald-Sun in Durham) splashed the Markup/AP findings across their front pages and contributed additional reporting about the North Carolina-specific data.

Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson saying controversial things could be a reality show. There’s easily enough content for multiple seasons. After all, his ascendency in North Carolina politics emerged from his confrontational speaking style. His mouth is what makes him so popular and disliked at the same time. Robinson even dares to weigh in on specific social issues where only one opinion is allowed now in the public square.

Driving home from the dog park, I was surprised to hear the (Dixie) Chicks’ terrific song “Wide Open Spaces” on the country oldies station. The group had been banished from country radio since 2003 after saying George W. Bush made them embarrassed to be Texans.

  • Updated

Closing down school buildings for many months last year — and offering poorly planned and executed virtual schooling as an inadequate substitute — proved to be a disaster for North Carolina children, families, and the education system itself.

North Carolina’s Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson is shameless when it comes to bellowing against make-believe threats to God, guns and heterosexuals. But even if the state’s highest-elected Republican is beyond embarrassment, he is still embarrassing for North Carolina, and especially for North Carolina Republicans.

My daily walk to and from school in first grade was past the house of the neighborhood bully. Day after day I came home crying. Finally, my mother had enough. “Listen son,” she said. “I don’t like fighting, but I am sick and tired of you coming home every day crying because of that bully. The next time he starts in on you I want you to ball up your fist and hit him in the stomach. Don’t come home crying and complaining anymore.”

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