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The family of a cinematographer who was shot and killed by Alec Baldwin on the set of the film “Rust” has agreed to settle a lawsuit against Baldwin and the movie's producers. Filming could resume in January. The husband of deceased cinematographer Halyna Hutchins said Wednesday in a statement that he will act as executive producer of “Rust” under terms of the settlement. Widower Matthew Hutchins says filming will resume on “Rust” in January. New Mexico workplace regulators say the production company is disputing a fine for safety violations. Baldwin, Halyna Hutchins and others were rehearsing inside a chapel in October 2021 when the gun Baldwin held went off.

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A tender letter that author John Steinbeck penned to his son after the teen confessed he was in love for the first time is going up for auction. Boston-based RR Auction says the handwritten two-page letter shows the Nobel literature laureate's empathy and his expertise on matters of the heart. Thomas Steinbeck was 14 when he told his parents he was in love. His famous father wrote back: “If it is right, it happens — The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away." The “Of Mice and Men” and “Grapes of Wrath” author died in 1968. His son died in 2016.

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A new court filing from Angelina Jolie alleges that on a 2016 flight, Brad Pitt grabbed her by the head and shook her then choked one of their children and struck another when they tried to defend her. The descriptions of abuse on the private flight came in a cross-complaint Jolie filed Tuesday in the couple’s dispute over a winery they co-owned. A representative for Pitt denied the abuse allegations to The Associated Press. The allegations were first aired soon after the flight, but details have been kept sealed. The FBI and Los Angeles County's child services agency investigated but found no grounds for action against Pitt.

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Loretta Lynn, the Kentucky coal miner’s daughter who became a pillar of country music, has died. Lynn's family said she died Tuesday at her home in Tennessee. She was 90. Her compositions reflected her pride in her humble background and spoke frankly of her experiences as a woman and mother in Appalachia on such hits as “Coal Miner’s Daughter," “You Ain’t Woman Enough” and “The Pill.” Her bestselling 1976 autobiography was made into a movie, with Sissy Spacek winning an Oscar for her portrayal of Lynn. Lynn wrote unfiltered songs about sex and love, cheating husbands, divorce and birth control that sometimes got her in trouble with radio programmers.

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The Hollywood sign is getting a makeover befitting its status as a Tinseltown icon. After a pressure-wash and some rust removal, workers this week began using 250 gallons of primer and white paint to spruce up the sign ahead of its centennial next year. The entire renovation effort is expected to take up to eight weeks. Originally built in 1923, the sign read “Hollywoodland” to promote a property development. But after decades of neglect, the sign was shortened to read “Hollywood” and then was replaced in 1978 with a new one. The 45-foot-tall sign in the Hollywood Hills above Los Angeles is repainted every decade.

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The satirical site The Onion has some serious things to say in defense of parody. The online humor publication has filed a Supreme Court brief in support of a man who was arrested and prosecuted for making fun of the Parma, Ohio, police force on social media. After being acquitted of criminal charges, Anthony Novak sued the police for violating his constitutional rights. A federal appeals court ruled the officers have “qualified immunity” and threw out his lawsuit. Lawyers for the Onion say the brief was submitted in the self-serving interest of preventing political authorities from imprisoning humorists.

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After holding “Emancipation” in limbo following Will Smith’s slap of Chris Rock at the Academy Awards in March, Apple will release the actor’s next big project in December. The fate of the $120 million runaway slave thriller directed by Antoine Fuqua had been uncertain. One of Apple’s most high-profile productions yet, the film had once been expected to be a potential Oscar contender this year. But an awards-season rollout of a film headlined by Smith has obvious complications as Smith is banned from attending the Oscars for 10 years. Apple TV+ will debut “Emancipation” on Dec. 2 in theaters and stream it Dec. 9.

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The long list of celebrities promoting cryptocurrencies just got shorter. Kim Kardashian is being barred from doing so for three years — and will pay a $1 million fine — to settle federal charges that she recommended a crypto security to her 330 million Instagram followers without making clear that she was paid to do so. The reality TV star also must give up the $250,000 she was paid for the Instagram post about Ethereum Max tokens, plus interest. That's according to a Securities and Exchange Commission settlement announced Monday. Kardashian is the latest celebrity to get ensnared in regulations that require full disclosure by people getting paid to promote financial products.

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The actor and activist who declined Marlon Brando’s 1973 Academy Award for “The Godfather” on his behalf in an indelible protest of how Native Americans had been portrayed on screen has died. Sacheen Littlefeather was 75.  Her niece confirmed that Littlefeather died peacefully Sunday, surrounded by loved ones at her California home. The family said the cause was breast cancer. Littlefeather’s appearance at the 1973 Oscars would become one of the ceremony’s most famous moments. Littlefeather said she was “red-listed” from the industry afterward. The academy apologized to her earlier this year, and she said she would do it again.

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Moviegoing audiences kicked off the month of October with a horror movie. Studio estimates Sunday show Paramount’s “Smile” easily topped the North American charts with $22 million in ticket sales and left Universal’s rom-com “Bros” in the dust. Billy Eichner’s high-profile but modestly budgeted “Bros” launched with an estimated $4.8 million to take fourth place behind “Don’t Worry Darling” and “The Woman King.” But opening weekends likely aren’t the final word on either film. Horror movie audiences are generally front-loaded. “Bros" got great reviews and an A CinemaScore. That suggests strong word-of-mouth potential that could allow it to continue finding audiences through the fall.

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King Charles III has decided not to attend the international climate change summit in Egypt next month, fueling speculation that the new monarch will have to rein in his environmental activism now that he has ascended the throne. The Sunday Times newspaper reported that the decision came after Conservative Prime Minister Liz Truss objected to Charles attending the conference, known as COP27, when she met with the king last month at Buckingham Palace. But a member of Truss’ Cabinet said the government and palace were in agreement about the decision and suggestions to the contrary were untrue. Charles has been a champion of environmental issues for decades.

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Hundreds of hot air balloons lifted off Saturday, marking the start of an annual fiesta that has drawn pilots and spectators from across the globe to New Mexico's high desert for 50 years now. The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is one of the most photographed events in the world. It has become an economic driver for the state's largest city and a rare — and colorful — opportunity for enthusiasts to gather. Three of the original pilots who participated in the first fiesta in 1972 are among this year's attendees.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law Friday that will limit the use of conservatorships, the process in which guardians can be granted legal power to make life decisions for those deemed unable to make them. The new law, authored by Democratic Assemblymember Brian Maienschein drew attention after Britney Spears' conservatorship case became a national cause. It will require that judges document all alternatives to a conservatorship before granting one and give potential conservatees preference for selecting a conservator. Maienschein, who represents parts of San Diego, hopes the new law will help protect the autonomy of Californians with disabilities.

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This year’s Nobel Prize season approaches as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has shattered decades of almost uninterrupted peace in Europe and raised the risks of a nuclear disaster. The famously secretive Nobel Committee never leaks or hints who will win its prizes for medicine, physics, chemistry, literature, economics or peace. The awards will be announced starting next Monday. But there is no lack of causes deserving the spotlight that comes with winning the world’s most prestigious prize. There are wars in Ukraine and Ethiopia, disruptions to supplies of energy, food and financial stability, the climate crisis, and the ongoing fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Fans will have a chance to say goodbye to Naomi Judd, the late matriarch of the Grammy-winning country duo The Judds, on a tour starting Friday. The Judd family continues to grieve her sudden death on April 30 only weeks after the tour was announced. Wynonna Judd, who will helm the 11-city tour starting Friday, called it "devastatingly beautiful" to relive her memories of her mom during the tour. Daughter Ashley Judd recalled her mother's compassion and desire to learn, as well as her efforts to reduce the stigma of mental health. The family hopes that fans will be uplifted by her legacy of music and advocacy.

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BALTIMORE (AP) — The family of a young woman who was killed in 1999 will appeal a Baltimore judge’s recent order overturning the conviction of Adnan Syed, the man imprisoned for decades for Hae Min Lee's death, according to an attorney for the family.