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North Carolina has divided government. Its most powerful executive is the Democratic governor, Roy Cooper. Four of the seven justices of the North Carolina Supreme Court are also Democrats. But Republicans enjoy majorities in the General Assembly and Court of Appeals, and hold six of the 10 offices on the Council of State. Read more

We regularly encounter stories of Americans struggling to stay financially afloat, buffeted by the day's economic challenges. So many focus on a woman who is identified a quarter of the way in as a "single mother." She's often portrayed as facing the impossible demands of holding a paying job while caring for the young ones. Read more

The Bible commands Christians to welcome and care for the most vulnerable among us; that includes the immigrant and sojourner. In Hebrews 13, for example, we are called upon to “show hospitality to strangers” as though they were angels. It is with this knowledge, and faith in God’s love, that we pray for the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and the hundreds of thousands of young people who depend on it. Read more

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State AP Stories

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Emergency responders are seeking to evacuate residents from the largest barrier island off Florida's Gulf Coast, and survivors there spoke of the terror of riding out Hurricane Ian in flooded homes and howling winds. A volunteer group, Medic Corps, was flying residents off Pine island by helicopter on Saturday. The bridge to Pine Island was heavily damaged by the hurricane, leaving it reachable only by boat or air. Some residents said they hadn’t seen anyone from outside the island for days and spoke of being trapped in flooded homes as boats and other debris crashed around their houses in the storm surge. Some feared they wouldn't make it.

Local election officials across the United States are bracing for a wave of confrontations on Election Day in November. Emboldened Republican poll watchers, including many who embrace former President Donald Trump’s falsehoods about the 2020 election, are expected to flood election offices and polling places. The Republican Party and conservative activists have been holding poll watcher training sessions, but in many states they've barred the media from observing those sessions. Some Republican-led states passed laws after the 2020 election that require local election offices to allow poll watchers and give them expanded access to observe and challenge ballots.

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The remnants of Hurricane Ian have downed trees and power lines across North Carolina, and at least four storm-related fatalities.. The Johnston County Sheriff's Office says a woman found her husband dead early Saturday morning after he went to check on a generator running in their garage overnight. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper's office says there were also two storm-related traffic fatalities in Johnston County on Friday, and a drowning in Martin County. Damage reports across the state were less severe than in South Carolina and Florida. But over 90,000 people statewide were without power Saturday afternoon. That was down from over 330,000 earlier in the day.

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A revived Hurricane Ian has pounded coastal South Carolina after causing catastrophic damage in Florida. The storm washed away parts of piers and flooded streets in parts of South Carolina. The U.S. death toll from Hurricane Ian rose to at least 27 as Florida authorities confirmed several drowning deaths and other fatalities. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement said Friday that the deaths included a 22-year-old woman ejected in an ATV rollover because of a road washout. Many other deaths were drownings, including that of a 68-year-old woman swept into the ocean by a wave. Authorities expect the death toll to rise further.

National & World AP Stories

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Jair Bolsonaro has outperformed expectations with his reelection bid, proving that the right-wing wave he rode to the presidency remains a force in Brazil. That gives him and opponent Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva three weeks to pursue votes ahead of a winner-take-all runoff. Da Silva came just 1.6 percentage points from outright victory and is likely to reach out to moderates to push him over the top. Political analysts say Bolsonaro now will seek to to win endorsements from politicians seeking advantageous alliances. The election will determine whether a leftist returns to Brazil's helm or whether Bolsonaro can advance his far-right agenda for another term.

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Wall Street rallied to its best day since July as falling bond yields eased some of the pressure that’s battered markets. The S&P 500 rose 2.6% Monday, the latest swing for a scattershot market that’s been mostly falling this year on worries about a possible global recession. Treasury yields fell after a report on U.S. manufacturing came in weaker than expected. That could mean the Federal Reserve won’t have to be so aggressive about raising interest rates to beat down the high inflation damaging households’ finances, but analysts still see plenty more turbulence ahead.

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An independent investigation into the scandals that erupted in the National Women’s Soccer League found emotional abuse and sexual misconduct were systemic in the sport, impacting multiple teams, coaches and players. U.S. Soccer commissioned the investigation by former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates and a law firm after former NWSL players Sinead Farrelly and Mana Shim came forward with allegations of harassment and sexual coercion dating back a decade. But it was clear the problems were widespread. Five of the 10 head coaches in the league last season either were fired or stepped down amid allegations of misconduct.