“I’m tired of reading yesterday’s news tomorrow,” a friend complained about his local daily newspaper. “I’m not going to pay to get Saturday’s ball scores in Monday or Tuesday’s paper.” The once proud newspaper profession has been humbled and weakened, causing concerns about the future of informing the public. Read more

For sure, Democrats rejoiced as they watched Republicans painfully twist in the wind at the beginning of LGBTQ Pride Month, trying to figure out how to position their party on this issue. Read more

Surf the latest U.S. headlines on immigration, and you’ll read plenty of criticisms from Republicans against Vice President Kamala Harris for not visiting the southern border and plenty of frustrations from Democrats that she needs to focus more on the root causes of migration out of Central America. Lost in this back-and-forth is a noteworthy development: the formation of a task force led by the Department of Justice to go after human smugglers and traffickers. Read more

When U.S. President Joe Biden met with America’s top allies at the G-7 summit in England last week, the primary objective seemed to be to signal-boost the appearance of unity against America’s geopolitical adversaries. The primary bogeyman propped up for use as a rhetorical punching bag was China, suggesting a pivot away from Russia as the designated global villain. Read more

State AP Stories

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Eleven U.S. mayors — from Los Angeles to tiny Tullahassee, Oklahoma — have pledged to pay reparations for slavery to a small group of Black residents in their cities, saying their aim is to set an example for the federal government on how a nationwide program could work.

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Shocked by an Associated Press investigation into the loss and theft of military guns, the Pentagon's top general signaled Thursday that he will consider a “systematic fix” to how the armed services keep account of their firearms.

National & World AP Stories

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NEW YORK (AP) — The declaration of Juneteenth as a federal holiday is putting the pressure on more U.S. companies to give their employees the day off, accelerating a movement that took off last year in response to the racial justice protests that swept the country.

  • Updated

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Eleven U.S. mayors — from Los Angeles to tiny Tullahassee, Oklahoma — have pledged to pay reparations for slavery to a small group of Black residents in their cities, saying their aim is to set an example for the federal government on how a nationwide program could work.