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Now that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, abortion could soon become illegal in half of the country. Or so Democrats warn. But it’s impossible to know how the debate will play out in many states. And a study this month by the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights, suggests that the practical consequences for abortion could be far less severe. Read more

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There’s not much middle ground regarding the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision. I’ve listened to some praising our justices as well as others, usually louder, vilifying them. But after the rhetoric wanes a bit there’s one common ground on which most all can agree: elections matter. Read more

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State AP Stories

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear a case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures and blocking state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday threw out the 2020 conspiracy and bribery convictions of a major political donor in North Carolina and his associate, declaring that the trial judge erred in his jury instructions.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Republican legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled state budget adjustments for the coming year, proposing to spend or set aside billions in expected extra tax collections to raise worker pay, recruit companies, build more infrastructure and combat inflation.

National & World AP Stories

The evolving legal landscape around abortion access is causing confusion for providers and patients across the country after the overturning of Roe v. Wade. In Florida, a new law banning abortions after 15 weeks went into effect Friday, after a judge said he would sign an order next week temporarily blocking it. Patients in Kentucky who were forced to cancel appointments with abortion providers this week are now scrambling to reschedule after a court there blocked the state’s restrictions. Elsewhere, clinics are reporting an influx of new patients from out of state, overwhelming providers and leading heath centers to tailor procedures to the legality of abortion in a person’s home state.

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The fireworks are still a few days away, but travel for the July Fourth weekend is off to a booming start. The Transportation Security Administration said Friday that it screened more people on Thursday than it did on the same day in 2019, before the pandemic. Travelers so far seem to be experiencing fewer delays and canceled flights than they did earlier this week. But it's still early. Leisure travel has bounced back this year, offsetting weakness in business travel and international flying. Still, the total number of people flying has not quite recovered fully to pre-pandemic levels.

The Supreme Court decision to limit how the Environmental Protection Agency regulates carbon dioxide emissions from power plants could make an already grave situation worse for those affected most by climate change and air pollution, advocates say.

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Ukrainian authorities say Russian missile attacks on residential buildings in a coastal town near the port city of Odesa have killed at least 21 people, including two children. Video of the pre-dawn attack Friday showed the charred remains of buildings in the small town of Serhiivka. The Ukrainian president’s office said three X-22 missiles fired by Russian bombers struck an apartment building and a campsite. The assault came after Russian forces withdrew from a nearby Black Sea island on Thursday. Russia took control of Snake Island in the opening days of the war. The withdrawal of its troops had given Ukrainian's cautious hope that Odesa, home to Ukraine's biggest port, might be less at risk.