In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, flying trapeze instructor and school owner William Hsu, right, grabs his student on another bar during their first day of practice at the Flying Trapeze Philippines School in suburban Makati, south of Manila, Philippines. The new facility teaches students basic techniques from taking off a platform as high as a three-story building, hanging on to the swinging trapeze bar with your hands or back of knees and landing on the safety net below said Hsu. The sport has been gaining adherents, he said, with more than 150 such schools worldwide. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
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Aaron Favila

In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014, flying trapeze instructor and school owner William Hsu, right, grabs his student on another bar during their first day of practice at the Flying Trapeze Philippines School in suburban Makati, south of Manila, Philippines. The new facility teaches students basic techniques from taking off a platform as high as a three-story building, hanging on to the swinging trapeze bar with your hands or back of knees and landing on the safety net below said Hsu. The sport has been gaining adherents, he said, with more than 150 such schools worldwide. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Trapeze school offers novices a chance to fly

The Associated Press

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WATERTOWN, Mass. — It is 20 feet up to the thin red board that serves as a launch pad for the flying trapeze. But the mental space in which the mind does its gymnastics is boundless, always reaching the same end: This is a bad idea.

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