Boeing triggers a high-stakes courtship

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Eastern North Carolina is dressing up to go courting a bride with one of the largest dowries ever seen. Here comes Boeing, a giant aircraft manufacturing plant that would employ thousands of workers with high-paying jobs, bring millions of dollars in investment and who knows how many supporting companies?

The Global TransPark in Kinston would love nothing more than to announce that kind of wedding. But of course, so would Greensboro and Charlotte and – oh, yeah – a dozen or so other states.

Try to imagine the economic impact a plant of Boeing’s size would make on an area that as suffered as much as Eastern North Carolina. And now try to imagine the size of the incentives package it’s going to take to land that giant aircraft.

Missouri is rumored already to have put together a $1 billion proposal. South Carolina reportedly put up $500 million for a Boeing assembly plant in 2009. North Carolina, still smarting from the loss of a Continental Tire Plant to South Carolina two years ago, would have to come up with a boatload of chips in a game with those kinds of stakes.

But would it be worth it?

The reason Boeing is even in the picture is because the company no longer appreciates the love and companionship of Washington state, where it now resides. Some skeptics say the plant is publicly looking just to press Washington into offering a better deal for the plant to stay.

And there lies just one of the traps of industrial courtship. Putting together a billion dollar deal provides little guarantee that a company will stay forever. And how fair is such a package to smaller companies who have grown up in North Carolina with very few of the plums that a Boeing package would entail?

The workforce and investment that Boeing would bring is huge. But so is the price of entry. There’s no such thing as an easy hand in the high-stakes game of industrial recruiting.

Comments

Tickles the hell out of me

when one mentions that this area does not have people who are educated enough to do certain jobs. I say look at the majority of the workforce of the companies that are here from the highest paid to the lowest and report back with the percentage of the people that live here that works in these companies. So since some folks say the people that live here are not educated enough to do the jobs, that means that the percentage I ask for above must consist of the majority of the folks commuting here. I say not so. Can't wait to see the percentage report. Oh but these folks will not do the real research to report back. I am Curmilus Dancy II @ thepoliticalagitator.com

Curmilus wrote:when one

Curmilus wrote:
when one mentions that this area does not have people who are educated enough to do certain jobs. I say look at the majority of the workforce of the companies that are here from the highest paid to the lowest and report back with the percentage of the people that live here that works in these companies. So since some folks say the people that live here are not educated enough to do the jobs, that means that the percentage I ask for above must consist of the majority of the folks commuting here. I say not so. Can't wait to see the percentage report. Oh but these folks will not do the real research to report back. I am Curmilus Dancy II @ thepoliticalagitator.com
The mumbo-jumbo you just uttered dancing curly aloy with 89 cents will get you a large coffee at any Hardees

No chance of Boeing in Eastern N.C.

Recently I read about the Boeing search for a new plant to build the 777. They wanted land and incentives and I though yes, that could be done. As I read further, basically Easter N.C. was eliminated as Boeing said it would require a well educated technically oriented work force. In all due respect to my home area, we are not qualified to fill that need.

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