Left to right:  Program Chairman Maryann Rettino, left, stands with speaker Alex Measamer, an occupational therapist with Vidant Health. Charlotte Edmondson's designer flower arrangement sits on the table between them.
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Left to right: Program Chairman Maryann Rettino, left, stands with speaker Alex Measamer, an occupational therapist with Vidant Health. Charlotte Edmondson's designer flower arrangement sits on the table between them.

Edgecombe Garden Club learns garden tips

By Dee Long

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The Edgecombe Garden Club held a noon luncheon Sept. 5 for a at the Fountains of the Albemarle.

After President Pauline Nicolosi welcomed everyone to the first meeting of the year, Willie Gupton, Devotion Chairman, read “God’s Store.”

Karen Andrus, executive director of the ECC Foundation at Edgecombe Community College, encouraged members to vote FOR a quarter-cent sales tax increase on the Nov. 6 ballot.

If passed, the proceeds will enable ECC to move forward with the planning, design and construction of its top two priorities: A Biotechnology and Simulation Center (Health Center), on the ECC Rocky Mount Campus and a Workforce Training Center on the ECC Tarboro Campus.

President Pauline invited members to attend the District 12 N.C. Garden Club, Inc. annual meeting on 10 a.m. Wednesday in the Wilson Country Club.

Candis Owens told of the Blount Bridgers Garden Committee offering four different designs of Eastern North Carolina handmade cypress obelisks for your garden. There are two sizes (5 feet for $75 and 6 feet for $100) in four styles. The top can be either a wooden finial or a copper crown. Paint, add vines or just leave it plain to weather. Email Karen Andrus at andrusk@edgecombe.com for a picture. Delivery takes three weeks.

Speaker Alex Measamer, Occupational Therapist of Vidant Health, suggested some “Garden Tips.”

Do a safety yard check for hazards like roots, uneven ground, loose steps and rocks. Fix unsafe items. To save uncomfortable waiting time after a fall, carry a cell phone outside. Use a cane or walking stick on uneven ground and to get up easily after falls. A ski pole with a pointed tip can be used for a gardening cane, picking up trash, or holding down a branch.

Do not climb up on chairs or old turned-over five-gallon cans. Ladders can tip over on uneven surfaces.

Poor balance on a slope or bank can cause a broken hip. Less bending, lifting and digging is easier in 2-3 feet high raised plant beds where you add a long, wide top board for sitting and reaching easily.

Another way to bring gardening to your waist level is to put herbs and flowers on a patio table. Vertical gardens or a trellis allow you to plant and weed without stooping or bending.

With steering knobs, use the other hand to balance. For less effort, plant bulbs and other perennials for color. It is easier to manage a container garden than a garden. Grow low-maintenance plants.

Choose the best time to do certain tasks. The soil is softer after it rains making it a good time to dig. Use a kneeling pad.